Virginia Marine Resource Bulletin Winter 2012

February 3, 2012

Leading Learning: From the Classroom to Virginia Beach

A century from now, 18-30% of Virginia Beach’s current land area could be underwater, according to a number of studies of projected sea level rise. On a shorter timescale, many residents are already seeing increased flooding, erosion, and storm damage. These impending changes led to a partnership between a team of students and faculty from the University of Virginia and the City of Virginia Beach, the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission, and the nonprofit, Wetlands Watch, for a series of projects aimed at helping the city respond and adapt to sea level rise.
January 26, 2012
Graduate students Malee Jinuntuya, Billur Celebi and Meredith McPherson prepare to count submerged seagrass abundance. ©Carly Rose/VASG

Light Beneath the Surface: Requirements for Seagrass Growth

Old Dominion University professor Dick Zimmerman and his lab are developing a new model to predict where seagrass can grow in the Bay. This article features the work of communications intern Kate Schimel and photography intern Carly Rose.
January 26, 2012
A youngster tries his first oyster. ©Kim Warner/VASG

Tasting the Bay

Even if you’ve tried raw oysters, you may have never really tasted one. Like wine, oysters grown in different areas taste different because they take on the characteristics of their environment. Simply slurping your oysters means you miss these delicate flavors. At the second annual Halfshell Oyster Tasting event in November, the Tidewater Oyster Gardeners Association (TOGA) helped more than 200 people learn to really taste oysters. Attendees put their taste buds to the test trying to differentiate oysters from six growers who raise oysters at different places along the Chesapeake Bay. Virginia Sea Grant (VASG) and our extension partners were proud cosponsors of this fun event.
January 26, 2012
VIMS Ph.D. student and VASG Fellow Ryan Schloesser recovers a labmate’s buoy while trawling for flounder on the Eastern Shore. Photo ©Janet Krenn/VASG

Focus on Students

VASG is developing the future workforce of marine and coastal experts through fellowships, internships, and much more. The Winter 2012 Bulletin issue features work by and about students.
January 26, 2012
©Janet Krenn/VASG

Virginia Sea Grant Announces New Research Projects

[…]
January 26, 2012

Virginia Students Earn Prestigious Knauss Fellowships

[…]
January 5, 2012

VIDEO: Burreson’s Contributions to Science, Policy Recognized with 2011 Mathias Medal

On a mid-October evening, Gene Burreson, who colleagues consider “one of maybe two of the most important figures in the field” of fish and shellfish pathology, stood before a room of resource managers, industry members, scientists, and family and humbly stated, “Although this award is only given to one person, science is not done alone. I’ve been lucky that I’ve always hired good people to work with me.”
December 12, 2011

Virginia Sea Grant Announces VCU, Mason Join Network of Coastal Experts

George Mason University (Mason) and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) have joined the Virginia Sea Grant community as partner institutions this fall. In addition to holding an advisory roll with Virginia Sea Grant, partner institutions benefit from joining a network of experts in coastal and marine science, extension, and communications in Virginia.

End Users

Educators

Proposal Reviewers

Principal Investigators

Advisors

Students